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2022-06 Factsheet - Nigeria

< Mar 2022
June 2022
Hamidu Sani/SAF, 2022

Highlights

The Shelter/NFI and CCCM sector in the reporting month of June initiated series of advocacies through its CCCM partners and government counterparts (NEMA and SEMA) on the need to scale up on the shelter intervention which includes the repair and construction of more shelters to accommodate 5,165 Internally displaced population who are sleeping outside without shelter, and 14,120 in reception centres plus the new arrivals. Notably the provision of NFIs as a complementing component to the shelter intervention as well as items that are needed for day-to-day survival, cannot be overemphasized given the increasing needs prompted by multiple displacements due to the unstable security environment and other social, natural, and economic factors.

NFI(HH)

Shelter(HH)

Need analysis

In June, there was a slight increase in the movement of the internally displaced population as compared to May resulting from heightened voluntary relocations and security concerns in NE Nigeria. A total of 16,471 arrivals were recorded, with the highest arrivals being into Bama LGA in Borno state with 5,862 individuals, a majority of whom ended up in Shehuri/Hausari/Mairi ward. Guyuk LGA also recorded a high number of arrivals with 2,025 individuals with over 12.3 % going to Dumna ward. Other LGAs with a high number of arrivals are Gwoza (1,865), Larmude (1,719), Askira/Uba (632), and Gombi (461). These arrivals included those from neighboring countries of Cameroon (1,139) and Niger (156). The highest departures, with 27.9 % were recorded in Askira/Uba (582), Michika (217), and Gombi (190).

The Shelter/NFI and CCCM sector in the reporting month of June initiated a series of advocacies through its CCCM partners and government counterparts (NEMA and SEMA) on the need to scale up on the shelter intervention which includes the repair and construction of more shelters to accommodate 5,165 Internally displaced population who are sleeping outside without shelter, and 14,120 in reception centers plus the new arrivals. Notably, the provision of NFIs as a complementing component to the shelter intervention as well as items that are needed for day-to-day survival, cannot be overemphasized given the increasing needs prompted by multiple displacements due to the unstable security environment and other social, natural, and economic factors.

Response

In June, Sector partners continued to scale up the response to deliver camp coordination and camp management (CCCM) as well as shelter and non-food items (NFIs) assistance to meet the immediate and long-term needs of the displaced population including the arrivals. 140 households benefitted from emergency shelter solutions which include emergency shelter kit distribution and emergency shelter construction, bringing the total of assisted since the beginning of the year to 2,821 households. 100 households benefitted from housing repairs and improvement interventions in both camps and host communities making 271 households assisted so far in 2022. Transitional shelter solutions have been provided to 2,283 households this far. To complement the provision of shelter solutions, 847 households received NFIs in both camp and host communities. This brings the total assisted, with NFIs, since the beginning of the year to 13,726 households.

Gaps / challenges

As the rainy season continues, 24 camps have been reported on the AD-HOC site tracker reporting tool to have been affected by either flood or strong winds across Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe states. While the sector and its partners continue to make efforts to support the affected population with adequate shelter and NFI support and flood mitigation tools, the challenges and gaps remain unaddressed as reported by CCCM partners with major reasons tagged to lack of capacity as well as procurement/logistics issues. Access and safety are also key challenges in Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe states that continue to hinder partners from actively intervening to the affected populations.

Shelter and NFI needs continue to pile up with shelter and NFI partners of the sector continue to face challenges of inadequate funding capacity to meet all the required needs.